Richmond Wong

Richmond Wong

PhD Student

Websitehttp://people.ischool.berkeley.edu/~richmond/

Blog posts: http://biosense.berkeley.edu/author/richmond/

I am a PhD student at the UC Berkeley School of Information, working with Professor Deirdre Mulligan and a member of the BioSENSE research group. My research investigates how design methods and approaches can be used to proactively raise privacy and other social values-related concerns in technology design, and be used to explore alternative ways to develop technologies in ways that are cognizant of these issues. I draw upon work and approaches from science & technology studies, human computer interaction, and speculative and critical design.

Most recently, I have done work creating workbooks of speculative design fictions depicting biosensing technologies in a range of scenarios to help reflect on technical, social, and legal aspects of privacy. I have also used these workbooks as probes to engage research participants in discussions about privacy (and other social values), trying to understand how the conceptualize privacy-related issues, and where they see points of intervention to address those issues, whether they be technical, policy, or social interventions.

I graduated from Cornell University in 2014 where I double majored in Information Science and Science & Technology Studies. I completed a senior honors thesis entitled ‘Wireless Visions: Creating and Contesting Sociotechnical Imaginaries of Electromagnetic Spectrum,’ under the guidance of Prof Steve Jackson, investigating the technical and policy work currently being done to advance new frameworks for sharing radiospectrum frequencies motivated by the prospect of providing more wireless broadband.

I was an intern at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), working with President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and OSTP Awards and Events in the summer of 2012 and was a 2011 Fulbright Summer Institute Participant, spending a month in London studying aspects of British citizenship.

I am also a recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship in Computer & Information Science & Engineering.